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CNN 3
CNNW 3
CSPAN 3
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KPIX (CBS) 2
LINKTV 2
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
KRON
Jan 19, 2013 8:00pm PST
, in 1905, was the first president to draw massive crowds. but, in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war two was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> "but that was a very unique year, 1945, and most normal situations, even if we're in a recession or we're in a foreign war we still throw pretty big inaugurals." >> reporter: for maurice madden. it is mainly a big moment. >> "i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say, you know, that i was part of american history and that really means a lot to me." >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, c-n-n, washington. >> hundreds of thousands of people will be able to witness the event. but they won't be able to share the event as easily as they would hope. >> it looks like it is going to be a bit more mild than it was four years ago. partly to mostly cloudy skies with a few late shower possibilities. clear skies and relatively mild. 50s. has to go through tonight and after midnight temperatures will be dropping into the 30's. 20's. th
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 2:00pm EST
tradition of the inauguration speech tell that the capital. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision. the president of the united states can decide above and beyond the date and the time everything else is tradition and can be changed. we reverted back to holding inaugurations at the capitol. we moved them from the east front to the west front and the crowd has been getting bigger and bigger. one reason on the west front is that you can accommodate more people. if you look at the photographs of the last several inauguration's, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was sworn in, the crowds went back to a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, at the crowd gets a little
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 4:25pm EST
hoover, franklin roosevelt, which was signed by his wife, eleanor roosevelt, harry truman, and dwight eisenhower, lyndon johnson, john kennedy, richard nixon, gerald ford, jimmy carter, ronald reagan, george bush, and so on. more recently, george w. bush and barack obama. the tradition has been maintained. when a new president is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact them and have them sign this historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it is one of those great pieces of history that has been long associated with this church, from 1856 till the present one of the little-known fact about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custom in modern times to have a church service, and worship service of some kind before the president takes the oath of office. people feel this is a longstanding tradition. it began with franklin roosevelt on march 4, 1933. when he wished to have a worship service take place before he took the oath of office, in the depths of the great depression. he contacted the church and he organized a special service with his former headma
CNN
Jan 19, 2013 3:00pm PST
the bitter partisan divide that exists in washington in the speech? >> i was just reading franklin roosevelt's second inauguration speech and he was in the a similar situation to barack obama. the economy was struggling. and he did not give a speech that was designed to say, heal the nation's wounds and bring the nation together. he gave a surprisingly polarizing speech saying we have a ways to go. we have got a -- it's not about more for those who already have much. it's about helping those who have nothing. it was called the one-third of the nation speech, because he pointed out, look, we are not at the promised land, i see a nation that has a long way to go. do we quit now. i expect actually, look barack obama's main goal is to democratic house in two years. unless he does that, he will not legislatively anything that he wants. so, if that is -- we are going to see a test of that in this speech and we will see a test of that in the first few days of the administration. if the agenda is polarizing, then we see himming looking at 2015. >> van, do not go too far, when we come back, a rare lo
FOX News
Jan 16, 2013 1:00pm PST
. >> neil: do executive actions like this hold up? when franklin roosevelt, passed the supreme court, they said you went too far. how long does it take and what is the process? we have two dozen executive actions taken today. how many and how long get undone? >> roosevelt proposed legislation and his own democratic house and his own vice president, former speaker of the house -- obama doesn't believe in legislation. i believe it's unconstitutional. the attempt to compel private citizens to report on private citizens under the guise it my save a child. we could deputize anybody on that. >> neil: maybe by blitzing this out today, he made it more difficult for guys like you to pick him apart. he may say, well, the majority nd i'm going to win.g to get >> i would say half of these absolute crap, just p.r. junk that he put together with his cabinet -- i'm ordering on you to do a report. why doesn't he do it? those aren't the ones that bother me. i'll give you another example. he'll issue a presidential memorandum to research the causes and prevention of gun violence. that is an illegal ex
FOX News
Jan 20, 2013 12:00pm PST
historian, he will have taken four oaths, puts him at the same league at fdr. >> that is right. franklin roosevelt took the oath four times and bit of a fluke for a president who is limited to two terms to take it four times. that is what happens when you have it last time and repeat it and, of course, we had january 20th fall on sunday which is private ceremony today. >> eric: you have written about the resolution and founding fathers. what do you think they would say if they came back and turn the tv and watched what is going to happen tomorrow? >> i think they would be thrilled that so many american people can watch the peaceful transfer of power under the u.s. constitution. that is really what an inauguration is all about. >> eric: george washington wore ra brown suited and white silk stockings, and he had a sword. can you imagine if the president came out with a sword? and it was the same sense of history and love of our country that has continued through all these years? >> yes, the love of country and patriotism, things are different but obviously washington's first inaugural was
CNN
Jan 19, 2013 3:00am PST
massive crowds. but in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war ii was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> that was a very unique year, 1945. in most normal situations, even if we're in a recession or if we're in a foreign war, we still throw pretty big inaugurals. >> reporter: for maurice madden, it is mainly a big moment. >> i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say, i know that i was, you know, a part of american history. and that really means a lot to me. >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, cnn, washington. ♪ why not make lunch more than just lunch? with two times the points on dining in restaurants, you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it end
ABC
Jan 20, 2013 8:00am PST
it a second time so now a third time, tomorrow a fourth time. you'd thing it was franklin roosevelt. >> he is president. >> that's right. he had practiced so many times for that moment. we know how he felt. so, matt, tomorrow, what will you be looking for? what's the first thing you want to be -- you want to make sure you're sitting and watching. >> i think the first thing you watch for when both the president and the first lady come out of church. we sort of get the first glimpse as they do that but in the end what we all want to hear what's going to be in his inaugural address, how will he address a country incredibly divided and went through a rough and tumble campaign cycle and struggles in congress. what is he going to say to congress and the country? many inaugurals have gone down very well. some have not been well. >> abc's jon karl covers the white house and the president for us and, of course, we all are waiting for that inaugural address, but coming up to this inauguration day, the president struck quite a confrontational tone with congress. >> reporter: he sure has. also feels p
CBS
Jan 21, 2013 7:00am PST
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
Current
Jan 18, 2013 3:00am PST
times since what president? >> franklin roosevelt. >> all right. wins the prize? >> let me give you this. how about this? he is the first president, first democratic president since franklin roosevelt to be elected with more than 50% twice. he is also the first president since dwight eisenhower to be elected twice with more than 51%. >> there you go? >> ranken was above. a mandate. >> a second term. will we see any difference in his second term? what's the second term going to look like? i know you are talking about that with some folks in columbia? >> i will be up at the university of district of columbia with a great event organized by progressive democrats of america, national nurses united, communication workers, a lot of unions bringing together all sorts of folks. keith ellison will be there as well as a lot of other folks talking about this. i think obama can be different. the question is: will he? >> he was showing good signs? >> the transition has been one of the better trigs in modern history. he took on the whole fiscal cliff thing and was strong
LINKTV
Jan 15, 2013 9:00am PST
wallace, franklin delano roosevelt post of vice president and agriculture commerce secretary. it suggests that america would have been on a very different trajectory had his pass not been blocked in 1944. >> seeing the war clouds gathering on the horizon, roosevelt decided to run for a third term against the strongly anti-war candidate wendell willkie. the stakes were high. the nation would soon be a war. roosevelt weigh the options and chose a controversial secretary of agriculture, henry wallace, as his running mate. wallace had successfully overseen rebuilding after the depression. he had provided food stamps and school lunches. he instituted programs for land use planning and soil conservation. he carved out his credentials in the new year deals as an outspoken anti-fascist. he was considered the scientific community's best ally. he spoke out strongly against the building of a of racial theories in rebuke of the hitler polity -- policy. >> he first introduced me to the mysteries of plant fertilization. i spent a good many years breeding corn because the scientist deepened my appreciat
CNN
Jan 19, 2013 5:00am PST
on their heels. overreach is a common risk of presidents in their second term. classic example is franklin roosevelt wins the election, tries to change the supreme court. it all comes tumbling down. the president has to be conscious of that. divide republicans between those who believe the party has to try to rebuild itself, rebuild the national majority and those that are locked into a staunchly conservative view? >> even with the supreme court's decision, would you expect that it will still play a large role in the second term? >> it's absolutely critical for him to be able to make this work. his re-election means republicans in congress will not be able to repeal it. >> and next year is when we really start to feel the impact. >> absolutely. he is still in hand-to-hand combat with governors in particular in implementing it. a number of republican governors have refused to set up what's required, and the public component of expansion of coverage. there's lots of challenges of moving 30 million more people into an insurance-based system. so that could mean enormous implementation challeng
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:00am EST
: only two presidents have been sworn in on two separate occasions, franklin d. roosevelt and barack obama because of what happened in 2009. swearing in at noon eastern time today for the president, tomorrow is the public ceremony. vice-president joe biden will be sworn in within the next 10 minutes to 15 minutes from his residence. the flag in the center of your screen is the same one used in his ceremonial office. you can see two paintings. one is lincoln delivering his second inaugural address. one of the more memorable second inaugural addresses in history. guest: that is exactly right. the end of the civil war, leaving it the country at a press of this for which direction they could go. in his words, now the story is none, it set the groundwork for what he envisioned. historians have argued about how it was carried out and what may have been one of the world's greatest what ifs, if he had not been assassinated a few days later. let just a couple of miles to the white house, where the vice president and his official residence is located. the first vice-president of the president
ABC
Jan 21, 2013 6:30am PST
to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're going to hear from beyonce, and kelly clarkson, and james taylor, at this ceremony. they're having fun. probably tweeting that out. >> tweeting immediately. >> we'll be right back with much more of our inaug
CBS
Jan 19, 2013 5:00am PST
their presidencies. that changed for franklin delano roosevelt's first term of office with the passage of the amendment. it states the terms of the president and the vice president shall end at noon on the 20th day of january. the move prevented a lame duck presidency and allowed the incoming president to move quickly. >>> president obama will take part in a private oath tomorrow. it's just the second time an inauguration has fallen on a sunday. a traditional public inauguration will take place monday, but in reality, his second term will already have begun. since martin van buren and andrew jackson traveled by carriage in 1887 it's become tradition for the president to escort the president elect from the white house to the capitol for the white house ceremony. while that happened four years ago, it won't be the case monday as the president becomes the 21st president inaugurated to a second term. it will be hard to match the euphoria of four years ago as barack obama walked through the capital, nearly 2 million people anxiously stood by to witness history. >
NBC
Jan 21, 2013 7:00am PST
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
FOX News
Jan 20, 2013 3:00am PST
with the first one you have noted for us, involves franklin delano roosevelt. >> let's listen. >> my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into-- >> and that's interesting, because there was 1933 at the depression was on everybody's mind and everybody was afraid, so, what does he talk about? fear. >> it's a great speech in the sense he didn't get into policy prescriptions, he wasn't going to say i'm going to do this or i'm going to do that. or i have a 20-point plan. he spent the whole speech talking about the fact we need to get a steely resolve and see it through and talked about fear and said that's the only thing to fear, it's not about the future, we're going to be fine. one of the classics. >> steve: meanwhile, let's take a look at john f. kennedy's inaugural back in the '60s. >> our country and all who serve it, and the globe from that-- and truly like the world and so, my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. and
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)